The Death of E-Mail

I promised Cameron Conaway, the author of this excellent piece, that I would link to it. This happened more than a month ago. Then, because I got the request on e-mail, it slid below the line and got lost in my overflowing Gmail inbox. Ah, the ironies.

I think e-mail has it’s uses, but I just left an organization where the entire culture was based on e-mail and it was nuts. Overuse of e-mail has deleterious effects on organizational communication. Finding the sweet spot between no e-mail and the new frontier of organizational dynamics, ay, there’s the rub.

Have at this. You might learn a thing or two — or at least start to think about how you use e-mail.

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Why Email Will Be Obsolete by 2020

Over on Inc.com, John Brandon is issuing the prediction that e-mail will be obsolete in five years. He says that some other communications channel will come along to best it and that it’s not really that important in his daily life anyway. It clutters things up.

"AROBAZE". Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia CommonsTrue enough, that!

Also, in my world, students only use e-mail to talk to “old people” who are not Snapchatting their way to glory.

Here’s the thing, though, I think Brandon is wrong. Oh, not about email being obsolete by 2020. Hell, I think it’s obsolete now. The problem is that futurists always predict change out too long. Whatever the change agent is, it’ll be here before 2020.

And you can take that to the bank, kiddies.

Why Email Will Be Obsolete by 2020

Open E-Mail Much?

I think that I can speak for every single one of us when I say, “We get too damn much e-mail.” And yet, today’s workplace would grind to an absolute halt without it. Sometimes, though, it seems that the workday grinds to a halt because of it.

Don’t you self-filter? Even if you don’t set up folders and filters and tracks and every other slotting and sorting device for your e-mail. What do you choose to open?

Here’s a very interesting piece about personalization and how important it is to boost your open rates. I am ever-frustrated with those in my workplace who don’t see the benefits of electronic communication and even worse, those who don’t understand why it’s important to get people to open the e-mail.

Read this. Experiment. Let me know how your next personalized campaign ran.