Spotify, Streaming and How We Get Our Music

Thom Yorke is pissed. In case your Internets been down, the Radiohead frontman has joined longtime creative co-conspirator Nigel Godrich in decrying Spotify and the economics of streaming services like it. Atoms For Peace, the Radiohead side project on which Yorke and Godrich collaborate, has pulled its catalog from Spotify, citing inadequate compensation for new artists. Ive been a happy subscriber to Spotify since the day it launched in the U.S. But these guys have a point.

via Sure, We Like Spotify–But Thom Yorke Has A Good Point ⚙ Co.Labs ⚙ code + community.

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Ancient technology: Your great-grandmother’s iTunes. | Image: FredrikT/Wikimedia Commons

This is a good follow-up to yesterday’s post on piracy. The cut is from an excellent article by John Paul Titlow on Fast Company Labs about Spotify and the compensation of artists.

I’m particularly struck by some of the comments — I often am — because I am always amazed by how much of this the average John Q. Public does not comprehend. This is not about some mythic Horatio Alger who pulls himself up by his bootstraps and becomes a success. It’s about corporate greed. Rotten, stinking, all-American corporate greed. And if you want to see corporate greed at work, look in the following industries: (1) big oil, (2) healthcare, (3) recording, (4) tech. In that order.

The independent artist hitting big? You might as well be playing the lottery. Same odds. And, in spite of what you have been brainwashed to think: it’s always been that way.

Great article. Read it, please.

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